Doctor filling out form with patient

Tips for monitoring — Part 2: How to get the best monitoring results

Better data quality during your monitoring means more detailed information for your doctor and, hopefully, less testing for you moving forward.

For the best monitoring results, we’ve got you covered with world-class technology and a team of professionals that are with you every step of the way.

If you are about to start your monitoring, make sure you read this checklist to prepare your home.

Here are six (6) ways to ensure you get the best data quality during your monitoring period. Let’s break it down.

1. Keep your monitoring hub connected to power — at all times

When you arrive home from your connection appointment, the first thing you should do is set the monitoring hub up in the room that you will spend most of your time in.
Connect the power cord to the monitoring hub, check that the cord is securely attached to the power brick and plugged into the wall. Last but not least, switch the power on!

Diagram of the hub

[Image description: Diagram of the monitoring hub, pointing out the ‘Power outlet’, ‘Power brick’ and ‘Hub’.]

Loss of data affects the accuracy of results and, on occasion, testing may need to be repeated in order for a conclusive report to be made. That’s something we’d all like to avoid!

To help you stay on top of this, there is a light on your monitoring hub that indicates it is receiving power.

 

Seer Medical monitoring hub camera

Monitoring Hub V1

Seer Medical monitoring hub with green light on

Monitoring Hub V2

Red light

No light

Receiving power

Not receiving power

Solid green light

Flashing light

Orange or yellow light

Blue light or no light

Receiving power

Not receiving power

Charging

Not recording (please call Seer support team)

Seer Medical monitoring hub camera

Monitoring Hub V1

Red light

No light

Receiving power

Not receiving power

Seer Medical monitoring hub with green light on

Monitoring Hub V2

Solid green light

Flashing light

Orange or yellow light

Blue light or no light

Receiving power

Not receiving power

Charging

Not recording (please call Seer support team)

Seer Medical support staff check that your data is being recorded properly twice a day and they are often able to alert you if your monitoring hub is not receiving power. Unfortunately, if we are unable to contact you or miss you before bed, precious data may be lost.

2. Swapping your batteries

For those with a belt or harness system, the recording device on your person is powered by a battery. To ensure your device records data, you must change your battery once a day.

You will receive two batteries:

  • One connected to the recording device in your system
  • A spare that you will need to charge when you arrive home from your initial appointment

It’s good practice to pick a particular time of the day and stick to it when changing your batteries. Whether it’s first thing in the morning or just before bed, sticking to the same time every day will help!

In the handbook you take home after the connection appointment, you will find a checklist to help you keep track of this task throughout monitoring. You will also receive a daily text message notification.

Keeping your system powered is crucial for a successful test.

3. Stay in front of the camera

Video recording is a powerful tool that clinicians gain valuable insights from when reviewing your data. The story told by your brain and heart waves will begin to paint a picture of the true nature of your events. In addition, the video can further your doctor’s understanding of your condition because they will be able to observe events themselves.

For many, the camera easily blends in with the furniture. Others may be uncomfortable with the idea of being recorded throughout the monitoring period. It’s important to remember that video data is only viewed by clinical scientists and specialists when confirming an abnormal finding in the brain or heart data or when reviewing an event.

For those who may not experience visible symptoms, the camera may not sound necessary. However, this is far from the case! It is well documented that people who have seizure-like events are often not aware of events they are experiencing. Symptom-less seizures happen frequently and can even be missed by people around you. However, when activity is detected on the EEG or ECG, our clinical scientists go back to look for triggers in your environment that are present during these events, and the video is essential for this.

Video recording is so important, we go into more detail in this blog, Video-EEG — Why is video used to diagnose seizures?

Smart phone and laptop charging

4. Avoid electronics plugged into power

When electrodes are placed on your head and chest, the electrical signals produced by your brain and heart are recorded. However, these signals can easily become lost in noise introduced by external sources. This is most common when a person comes into contact with certain appliances that are connected to a power source.

Devices you should not use while plugged in to power

  • Phones 
  • Electric blankets
  • Laptops

Some devices you can use while plugged in to power

  • Desktop computers
  • Electric toothbrushes 
  • Playstation & Xbox
  • Vacuum cleaner (briefly) 
  • Iron

If you are unsure about whether a device is suitable for use during your monitoring period, simply contact our support team on 1300 869 888, option 1.

5. Log your events

For the purposes of testing, an accurate record of when you are experiencing symptoms is essential in assisting our clinical scientists review your data.

Download the Seer app prior to your appointment to help you keep a record of your events before, during, and after your monitoring. Tracking events creates a digital time stamp of when, where, and what has occurred.

Timestamps help our team to navigate directly to the parts of the data where you’ve indicated something happened so that we can match up any physical symptoms with your EEG and ECG.

Additionally, the Seer app can be used as a medication scheduler — a useful tool for those who need a friendly reminder. Having a reminder of when to take medications — or a record of when you’ve missed them — can help your doctor make decisions about your medication moving forward.

Person cooling down with a fan

6. Complete the full duration for your study

Your doctor has requested a specific amount of time for you to be monitored, so it’s very important to follow through with your study right until the last day. They have chosen the duration with consideration of the frequency of your events, your circumstances, and the amount of monitoring time they need in order to get a sufficient report.

While it may be tempting to disconnect early because the equipment is getting uncomfortable or you think you’ve had enough events during your study, it is heavily recommended that you stick it out until your study is complete. Events are often unpredictable, and the case may be that you are experiencing events that you aren’t aware of.

If you disconnect early, any events that happen afterwards will not be captured. Unfortunately, this means that you will likely need to repeat the entire test if an event was not captured because of an early disconnection.

7. Avoid moisture and stay cool

To get a reliable recording of your brain activity, a strong adhesive is used to make sure the electrodes stay in place.

There are three (3) factors that will loosen the connection of the electrodes to your head.

1. Scratching

You may have an itch, but it’s best not to scratch! Scratching can dislodge the electrodes. Like with a pesky mosquito bite, ignoring it is best. However, if you are unable to shake the itch, scratch around the electrodes and keep it to a minimum. Gently applying pressure to an irritated electrode may also help to reduce discomfort.

2. Moisture

The small things make the biggest difference when undergoing any kind of medical testing and the daily ritual of showering is one of them! Depending on the system you are given, you may be able to bathe or shower.

To reduce the chance of moisture loosening the electrodes while bathing, it is important to use the shower cap provided. The shower cap should be pulled down over your ears and eyebrows. If you can, turn on a bathroom fan and keep windows open to reduce moisture.

3. Sweat

Just like the moisture from a steamy bathroom, sweat can also reduce the quality of the signals recorded from your head and chest. Try to stay cool to maintain a strong connection between the electrodes and your scalp. This means keeping your environment at a comfortable temperature and avoiding physical activity that may cause you to work up a sweat.

Happy monitoring!

By following these suggestions, you’ll be doing your part to ensure quality data is recorded throughout your monitoring period. For additional information get in touch and our friendly staff will be happy to answer your questions.

← Tips for monitoring — Part 1: How to prepare